Blog Archives

Abilities Update

mystic_newclassiconMYSTIC

I decided to change a few of the combat dynamics involving mystic_newclassiconMystics under healingstance_iconRestoration Stance. Having single-target spells only would make sense if Mystics’ direct heals were much stronger, like acolytes_newiconAcolytes e.g., but since Mystics heal their targets mostly over time, I felt like giving them at least one multiple-target spell. I also decided to redesign Arcane Remedy.

  • quietude_iconQuietude (Rank I, II, III) (Old!): heals one ally for 5.97/7.71/10.20 *28/26/24% ManaRemoves all of the Mystic’s effects. CD: 5/5/5 Turns. Estimated healing output at L. 506,686/8,023/9,806 HPQuietude will remove, if present, all Mystic-related beneficial effects from the target: VitalityRejuvenateRenewal and Arcane Remedy. The presence of these effects on the target has no influence at all on Quietude’s healing output: they are just removed. However, Quietude will benefit from Vitality before removing it, healing one ally for up to 27,065 HP (if @critical).
    • Quietude has an increased 25% chance to critically hit.
  • quietude_newiconQuietude (Rank I, II, III) (New!): heals all allies for 3.46/4.30/5.45 * 29/28/27% Mana. Removes all of the Mystic’s effects. CD: 4/4/5 Turns. Estimated healing output at L. 50: 4,011/4,813/5,883 HPquietude_newiconQuietude will not benefit from Vitality any more. However, whenever casting RejuvenateRenewal and Arcane Remedy, Mystics will also place a new buff on their targets, increasing the healing they will receive from quietude_newiconQuietude by 12% (the effect can stack up to 3 times, and it naturally wears off after 3 turns). The increased chance of dealing a critical hit has also been removed.
    • Again, the presence of VitalityRejuvenateRenewal and Arcane Remedy will have no impact whatsoever on the healing done by quietude_newiconQuietude unless quietude_newiconQuietude is cast within 3 turns after the effect has been applied.
  • Arcane Remedy (No Ranks) (Old!): recovers 19% HP and another 24% over 3 Turns (One Ally); CD: 4 Turns. Considering 30,800 HP, Arcane Remedy will immediately recover 5,852 HP and another (2,464*3)=7,392 HP over 3 Turns.
  • Arcane Remedy (No Ranks) (New!): heals for 5.74 * 18% Mana, and another 24% HP over 3 Turns (2 Random Allies); CD: 3 Turns. Estimated healing output at L. 50: 4,486 HP +(2,464*3)=7,392 HP over 3 Turns. So now Arcane Remedy will scale off Intellect (Mana Pool) like any other spell. Its cool-down has been reduced slightly, but the real difference is that the target will be two random allies other than the Mystic. Of course it might target twice the same ally.
  • combatstance_iconCombat Stance (Status) and healingstance_iconRestoration Stance (Status) now persist through death.
    • In later testing, it seemed unfair to reset Stances whenever passing out, because mystic_newclassiconMystics depend heavily on the Stance they choose.

thaumatuge_classnewiconTHAUMATURGE

I didn’t want the thaumatuge_classnewiconThaumaturge to depend on Spirit too much. Mana should not be too much of an issue for casters. Also, I wanted to buff spells dealing Ice magic damage in a way that would turn them into valuable choices for alternative rotations during the encounters that truly matter.

  • hyadaruko_iconHyadaruko and hyadain_iconHyadaīn apply intensecold_iconIntense Cold (Status) (New!) to the target: this debuff increases all Ice magic damage taken by 28%, stacking up to 2 times (=56%). The debuff can be refreshed continuously. Otherwise, it naturally wears off after 2 turns. The difference with ignite_iconIgnite (Status) is that intensecold_iconIntense Cold  cannot be consumed, it stays on the target for as long as it keeps getting refreshed.
    • While there are several spells dealing Fire magic damage, thus benefiting from ignite_iconIgnite (Status), hyadaruko_iconHyadaruko and hyadain_iconHyadaīn are the only spells so far dealing Ice magic damage.
    • All Status effects lowering or increasing Ice magic resistance will cancel intensecold_iconIntense Cold (Status) for all their duration. It is currently possible to be affected by both debuffs: ignite_iconIgnite (Status) does not automatically cancel intensecold_iconIntense Cold and viceversa.
  • ignite_iconIgnite (Status) increases Fire magic damage taken by 24% (up from 21%), stacking up to 2 times (=48%, up from 42%) and lasting for 3 turns (up from 2), unless refreshed. shanaku_newiconShanaku now correclty dispels ignite_iconIgnite (Status) and intensecold_iconIntense Cold (Status).
  • introspection_iconIntrospection (Passive) (New!) Gains 14% of the unit’s maximum Mana at the end of every turn. This is a flat amount and automatically adjusts itself to the unit’s Mana pool.
    • introspection_iconIntrospection (Status) stacks with any other Status affecting Mana regeneration (e.gmanarestoration_newiconConcentration).
  • ryuusei_iconRyūsei (Rank I, II, III) (Old!) Deals Fire and Earth damage for 7.72/10.50/14.80 * 34/30/26% Mana (2 Random Enemies). CD:6/6/5 Turns. Estimated damage done at L. 50: 10,499/12,594/15,395It can also target twice the same target.
  • ryusei_newiconRyūsei (Rank I, II, III) (New!) Deals Fire and Earth damage for 4.12/5.16/6.59 * 24/23/22% Mana (3 Times, All Enemies). CD:6/6/5 Turns. Estimated damage done at L. 503,953/4,744/5,799ryusei_newiconRyūsei will damage all enemies 3 times. So the overall damage output would become: 11,859/14,232/17,397.

priestclass_iconPRIEST

Basically, I wanted to nerf behoimi_iconMending Status (I/II), because together with the healing output of hoimi_iconHoimi it turned out to be a little too powerful at L. 50. So I came out with this idea of a “double” hoimi_iconHoimi.

  • hoimi_iconHoimi (Rank I, II, III) (Old!heals one ally for 7.12/11.04/17.35 *11/9/7% Mana. Also grants Mending (I/II) (Status). CD: 3/3/3Turns. Estimated healing output at L. 50: 3,313/3,976/4,859 HPbehoimi_iconMending (I/II) (Statuswill heal another 18/33% HP over 2/3 TurnsMending (II) (Status) will be granted only by Hoimi (III).
  • hoimi_iconHoimi (Rank I, II, III) (New!) heals twice for 3.76/5.52/8.67 * 11/9/7% Mana. It can apply Mending I/Mending II. CD: 3/3/3Turns. Estimated healing output at L. 501,656/1,987/2,429 HPbehoimi_iconMending (I/II) (Statuswill heal another 12/21% HP over 2/3 Turns.
    • hoimi_iconHoimi will heal overall for the same amount as before, except it will be cast twice on the same target, doubling its chances to apply both behoimi_iconMending (I/II) and endurance_iconEndurance (Status).
    • behoimi_iconMending (Status) now has about 50% chance (down from 100%) to proc on the target healed by hoimi_iconHoimi. Also, the healing over time granted by behoimi_iconMending (Status) has been reduced. Both ranks of behoimi_iconMending (Status) can stack up to 2 times (Rank II used to last for 3 turns).

acolytes_newiconACOLYTE

I wanted to make luminance_iconLuminance a more attractive spell at all levels. Making it cast twice on all targets, its chances to apply holyaegis_newiconHoly Aegis are doubled. I also wanted to take its healing output at all levels closer to sunshine_iconSunshine. There is currently as little as 20% difference between the two in the healing done.

  • luminance_iconLuminance (Rank I, II, III) (Old!) heals all allies for 4.06/5.10/6.55* 22/21/20% current Mana; estimated healing output at L. 503,572/4,287/5,240 HP. (CD: 5/5/5 Turns).
  • luminance_iconLuminance (Rank I, II, III) (New!) heals twice for 2.26/2.83/3.64 * 22/21/20% current Mana (All Allies); estimated healing output at L. 50: 1,986/2,383/2,912 HP. (CD: 5/5/5 Turns).
    • Being cast twice, luminance_iconLuminance increases its chances to critical hit and to apply holyaegis_newiconHoly Aegis. The amount healed overall has been slightly increased (about +11%).
  • holyaegis_newiconHoly Aegis (Class Passive) can now stack up to 3 times (up from 2), lasting 3 turns (up from 2). However, the shield provided by holyaegis_newiconHoly Aegis (Status) has been set to 4% (down from 11%). 3 stacks of holyaegis_newiconHoly Aegis will shield from 12% damage (down from 22%). The bonus healing received has been set to 12%, which means 36% (3 stacks), same as before.
  • divinespirit_iconDivine Spirit (Passive) (New!) Increases Spirit (+48).

guardian_newclassiconGUARDIAN

The purpose of the following changes was to give guardian_newclassiconGuardians a rotation of abilities they can perform.

  • elementalnemesis_iconElemental Nemesis (Rank I, II, III) (Old!) imbues the unit’s weapon with all natural Elements, dealing roughly 330/396/484% damage. Cost: 24/23/22% current ManaCD4/4/4 Turns. Also, at its maximum rank, Elemental Nemesis will ignore the target’s Defense, dealing true damage.
  • elementalnemesis_newiconElemental Nemesis (Rank I, II, III) (New!) fills the Guardian with Holy magic, dealing roughly 318/382/466% damage. CD4/4/4 Turnselementalnemesis_newiconElemental Nemesis consumes desecrate_newiconDesecrate (Status) on the target. This ability will always deal a critical strike.
    • desecrate_newiconDesecrate (Status) increases the damage taken from elementalnemesis_newiconElemental Nemesis by 23/46% (2 Stacks, 5 Turns).
    • Both righteousslash_iconRighteous Slash (II, III) and arcaneremedy_iconUnleash Fury (II, III) apply desecrate_newiconDesecrate on the target. As it is, elementalnemesis_newiconElemental Nemesis is granted a critical strike and can be picked after righteousslash_iconRighteous Slash (II, III) and arcaneremedy_iconUnleash Fury (II, III) to increase its damage significantly. desecrate_newiconDesecrate will also slightly increase the Holy magic damage taken by the target  (+9/18%), just in case players did not improve righteousslash_iconRighteous Slash and arcaneremedy_iconUnleash Fury to further Ranks before learning elementalnemesis_newiconElemental Nemesis.

DISCLAIMER: All of the icons published within this post were either drawn or edited by me. It would be best if you PM’ed me before using them, just to be sure that you credit the right people. Thank you.

Advertisements

RPG Clichés

Hi, everyone,
I promise to post a detailed update soon, and I’m still hoping for some constructive criticism from those of you who played LS Demo 1.5(d). However, in the meantime, here’s something I ran into today and wanted to share with you. (Here’s the source. Search the bottom of the page for the list of authors who contributed to this). It is a list of RPG Clichés: I am publishing here below the ones I liked the most.

Sleepyhead RuleThe teenage male lead will begin the first day of the game by oversleeping, being woken up by his mother, and being reminded that he’s slept in so late he missed meeting his girlfriend.

Garrett’s PrincipleLet’s not mince words: youre a thief. You can walk into just about anybodys house like the door wasnt even locked. You just barge right in and start looking for stuff. Anything you can find thats not nailed down is yours to keep. You will often walk into perfect strangers houses, lift their precious artefacts  and then chat with them like you were old neighbours as you head back out with their family heirlooms under your arm. Unfortunately, this never works in stores.

Capitalism Is A Harsh MistressOnce you sell something to a shopkeeper, he instantly sells it to somebody else and you will never see the item again no matter what.

Local Control Rule. Although the boss monster terrorizing the first city in the game is less powerful than the non-boss monsters that are only casual nuisances to cities later in the game, nobody from the first city ever thinks of hiring a few mercenaries from the later cities to kill the monster.

Bed Bed Bed. A good night’s sleep will cure all wounds, diseases, and disabilities, up to and including death in battle.

You Can’t Kill Me, I Quit (Seifer Rule). The good guys never seem to get the hang of actually arresting or killing the bad guys. Minor villains are always permitted to go free so they can rest up and menace you again later — sometimes five minutes later. Knowing this rule, you can deduce that if you do manage to kill (or force the surrender of) a bad guy, you must be getting near the end of the game.

Zap! Most villains in RPGs possess some form of teleportation. They generally use it to materialize in front of the adventurers when they reach the Obligatory Legendary Relic Room and seize the goodies just before you can.

Heads I Win, Tails You Lose (Grahf Rule) It doesn’t matter that you won the fight with the boss monster; the evil task he was trying to carry out will still get accomplished somehow. Really, you might as well not have bothered.

You Die, And We All Move Up In Rank. During the Fake Ending, the true villain of the story will kill the guy you’d thought was the villain, just to demonstrate what a badass he (the true villain) really is. You never get to kill the fake villain yourself.

“What are we going to do tonight, Vinsfeld?” The goal of every game (as revealed during the Fake Ending) is to Save the World from an evil figure who’s trying to take it over or destroy it. There is no way to escape from this formidable task. No matter whether the protagonist’s goal in life is to pay off a debt, to explore distant lands, or just to make time with that cute girl in the blue dress, it will be necessary for him to save the world in order to accomplish it. Take heart, though — once the world gets sorted out, everything else will fall into place almost immediately.

Zelda’s Axiom. Whenever somebody tells you about “the five ancient talismans” or “the nine legendary crystals” or whatever, you can be quite confident that Saving the World will require you to go out and find every last one of them.

Apathy Principle. Your group is the only bunch of people trying to save the world. All other would-be heroes will either join your party or else turn out to be cowards and/or con men.

Thousand Year Rule. The Ancient Evil returns to savage the land every thousand years on the dot, and the last time it showed up was just about 999.9875 years ago. Despite their best efforts, heroes of the past were never able to do more than seal the Evil away again for the future to deal with (which brings up the question of just how exactly does this “sealing away” work anyway, but never mind.) The good news is that this time, the Evil will get destroyed permanently. The bad news is that youre the one whos going to have to do it.

Ayn Rand’s Revenge. Outside the major cities, there is no government whatsoever. Of course, perhaps that explains why its so difficult and dangerous to get anywhere outside the major cities.

If You Meet The Buddha In A Random Encounter, Kill Him! When youre out wandering around the world, you must kill everything you meet. People, animals, plants, insects, fire hydrants, small cottages, anything and everything is just plain out to get you. It may be because of your rampant kleptomania (see Garrett’s Principle).

Magical Inequality Theorem. In the course of your travels you may find useful-sounding spells such as Petrify, Silence, and Instant Death. However, you will end up never using these spells in combat because a) all ordinary enemies can be killed with a few normal attacks, making fancy attacks unnecessary, b) all bosses and other stronger-than-average monsters are immune to those effects so there’s no point in using them for long fights where they’d actually come in handy, and c) the spells usually don’t work anyway.

Magical Inequality Corollary. When the enemy uses Petrify, Silence, Instant Death, etc. spells on you, they will be effective 100% of the time.

Supply and Demand Axiom. Killing a powerful enemy will usually yield an item or weapon that would’ve been extremely useful if you had gotten it before killing that enemy.

Guy in the Street Rule. No matter how fast you travel, rumours of world events always travel faster. When you get to anywhere, the people on the street are already talking about where you’ve been. The stories of your past experiences will spread even if no witnesses were around to see them.
Figurehead Rule. Whenever someone asks you a question to decide what to do, it’s just to be polite. He or she will ask the question again and again until you answer “correctly”.

Puddin’ Tame Rule. The average passer-by will always say the same thing no matter how many times you talk to them, and they certainly won’t clarify any of the vaguely worded warnings or cryptic half-sentences they threw at you the previous time.

Franklin Covey Was Wrong, Wrong, Wrong. Sticking to the task at hand and going directly from place to place and goal to goal is always a bad idea, and may even prevent you from being able to finish the game. It’s by dawdling around, completing side quests and giving money to derelicts that you come into your real power.

Selective Invulnerability Principle. RPG characters are immune from such mundane hazards as intense heat, freezing cold, or poison gas… except when they’re suddenly not. Surprise!

Perversity Principle. If you’re unsure about what to do next, ask all the townspeople nearby. They will either all strongly urge you to do something, in which case you must immediately go out and do that thing, or else they will all strongly warn you against doing something, in which case you must immediately go out and do that thing.

Arbor Day Rule. At some point, you’re going to have to talk to a tree and do what it says.

Make Room! Make Room! There are always more people in a town or village than there are houses for them to live in. Most of the village is made up of shops, temples, bars, secret passages, inns, and the mansion that belongs to the richest man in town.

Talk Is Cheap Rule. Nothing is ever solved by diplomacy or politics in the world of RPGs. Any declarations of peace, summits and treaty negotiations are traps to fool the ever so gullible Good Guys into thinking the war is over, or to brainwash the remaining leaders of the world.

Stop Your Life (Setzer Rule). No matter what kind of exciting, dynamic life a character was leading before joining your party, once there they will be perfectly content to sit and wait on the airship until you choose to use them.

First Law of Fashion. All characters wear a single costume which does not change over the course of the game. The only exception is when characters dress up in enemy uniforms to infiltrate their base.

Second Law of Fashion. Any character’s costume, no matter how skimpy, complicated, or simply outlandish, is always completely suitable to wear when climbing around in caves, hiking across the desert, and slogging through the sewers. It will continue to be completely suitable right afterwards when said character goes to meet the King.

Inheritance of Acquired Characteristics (Ramus Rule). Twenty-three generations may pass, but any person’s direct descendant will still look and act just like him.

Well, So Much For That. After you have completed your mighty quest to find the object that will save the known universe, it will either a) get lost, b) get stolen, or c) not work.

Vivi’s Spellbook Principle. Over the course of the game, you will spend countless hours learning between twenty and one hundred skills and/or spells, approximately three of which will still be useful by the end of the game.

Stealing The Spotlight (Edea Rule). The characters who join your party only briefly tend to be much cooler than your regular party members.

All The Time In The World (Rinoa Rule). Unless there’s a running countdown clock right there on the screen, you have as long as you want to complete any task — such as, say, rescuing a friend who’s hanging by one hand from a slippery cliff edge thousands of feet in the air — no matter how incredibly urgent it is. Dawdle or hurry as you will, you’ll always make it just in the nick of time.

Luke, I Am Your Tedious, Overused Plot Device (Lynx Rule). If there is any chance whatsoever that major villain X could be the male lead’s father, then it will turn out that major villain X is the male lead’s father.

Flow of Goods Rule. The quality of goods in the world is dependent upon the shop’s distance from the final dungeon. It doesn’t matter if the town you start in has a huge thriving economy and is the centre of world trade, it will always have the game’s worst equipment; and even if that village near the end is isolated and has only three people in it, it will have the game’s best equipment.

The Best-Laid Schemes The final villain’s grand scheme will have involved the deaths of thousands or even millions of innocent people, the clever manipulation of governments, armies, and entire populations, and will have taken anywhere from five to five thousand years to come to fruition. The hero will come up with a method of undoing this plan forever in less than five minutes.

Pyrrhic Victory. By the time you’ve gotten it in gear, dealt with your miscellaneous personal crises and are finally ready to go Save the World once and for all, nine-tenths of it will already have been destroyed. Still, you’ve got to give your all to save the remaining one-tenth.

Poetic Villain Principle (Kefka Rule). All villains will suddenly become poets, philosophers and/or dramatic actors when a) they first meet the hero, b) they are about to win or their evil plan is finally ready, c) some major event in the game is about to begin, d) right before the final battle, and e) right before they die, when they will frequently be feeling generous enough to reward you with some homespun wisdom about making the most of life while you have it.

Adam Smith’s Revenge. By the end of the game you are renowned everywhere as the Legendary Heroes, every surviving government and authority figure has rallied behind you, the fate of the world is obviously hanging in the balance, and out of nowhere random passers-by give you a pat on the back and heartfelt good luck wishes. However, shopkeepers won’t even give you a discount, much less free supplies for the final battle with evil.

Adam Smith’s Corollary. No matter how thoroughly devastated the continent/planet/universe is, there’s always some shopkeeper who survived the end of the world and sits outside the gates of the villain’s castle, selling the most powerful equipment in the game, like nothing ever happened.

The Long Arm of the Plot. Any bad guys, no matter how far they run, will always end up in one of two ways by the end of the game: obviously dead, or on your side. There is no in-between.

Apocalypse Any Time Now. The best time to do side quests is while the huge meteor hovers in the sky above the planet, waiting to fall and destroy the world.

“So, Andross, you reveal your true form!” You will have to kill the evil villain at least twice at the end of the game. First the villain will look like a person or some creature and be rather easy to kill. Then he will grow to about 50 times the hero’s size and be much harder to kill.

In Your Face, Jesus! Even if you manage to deal with him that time, you’re not done — the villain will then transform into his final form, which is always an angelic winged figure with background music remixed for ecstatic chorus and pipe organ.

Weapon Rule. There’s always a hidden creature who is much harder to defeat than even the ultimate bad guy’s final, world-annihilating form. It’s lucky for all concerned that this hidden creature prefers to stay hidden rather than trying to take over the world himself, because he’d probably win. As a corollary, whatever reward you get for killing the hidden creature is basically worthless because by the time you’re powerful enough to defeat him, you don’t need it any more.

The Ultimate Rule. Anything called “Ultima (whatever)” or “Ultimate (whatever)” isn’t. There’s always at least one thing somewhere in the world which is even more.

5/27 Update: New Spells: Ryuusei, Asutoron & Megante

  • Asutoron (Guardian, level 29):

This spell replaces the old Mahokanta, which caused an annoying bug in LS 1.3: enemies under the effect of Reflect Status became immortal. Besides, even if I liked the idea of a “reflecting shield”, later on in the game it became either too powerful or useless. That is because, if Mahokanta really did cast all spells back to the enemy, bosses would be hit by their own spells, and that’d be ridiculous. On the other hand, if I made it so that Mahokanta wouldn’t work with all spells, it would have become almost useless.

Asutoron, instead, works as a very powerful magic damage reduction. The shield will last for two turns. I am thinking about turning it to “All Allies”, rather than just one: that would make much more sense. This spell comes from Dragon Quest. The name means something like “Turning into iron” and it should also cause some movement impairment. Guardians will learn the ability when reaching level 29. No other class will learn Asutoron.

  • Ryuusei (Magician, level 27):

Ryuusei, also known as “Meteor”, is possibly the most powerful and spectacular spell in the game so far. You can see the animation in the video above (0:15). Other than “Earth” and “Bagima”, there was no other skill dealing Earth damage. Ryuusei costs 34% MP*1283 vs. 29*1083 (Ionazun) and 31*1198 (Ultima). However, Ryuusei will not target all enemies: it will be cast twice and it will target randomly either once two enemies or twice the same one (Scope: “2 Random Enemies”). Magicians will learn this ability when reaching level 27.

  • Megante OD (Guardian, level 31):

You can see the animation above (1:10). This is an Overdrive Technique, damaging all enemies and cutting their HP by 100%, at the cost of the caster’s life. Since it deals elemental damage (Sacred, the same as the Cleric’s healing spells), I will make all bosses immune to it: that’s mainly because 100% means 100%: if an enemy has, say, 109,000 HP, Megante will deal the exact same damage output. In the video above, Davian is immune to Sacred, which is why Megante is uneffective. Guardians will learn this ability when reaching level 31. I will also make a spell that will lower an enemy’s resistance to Sacred, meaning that Megante would still hit bosses, but for 50% or less of its capability.

5/23 Update: Screenshots

Hi, everyone! It’s time for a few more screenshots!

  • The Quest Journal

  • Abilities and Icons: the icons for Kiariku, Zameha and Kiararu are original, the rest of them are edits.

I have replaced the old damage/healing output numbers Pup-Up with these ones. I made them myself: they may look simple, but they took me some time.

I have replaced the Talent Points Pop-Up with the one below.

  • Engon, SOUTHSTON. Leomorn’s birthplace:

I am still drawing these maps, which is why there’s almost no NPC there. I have also changed the shop tile. I know that it looks a bit unnatural, but I kind of like it more than before anyway.